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Perception in France of the Australian system for the prediction of beef quality (Meat Standards Australia) with perspectives for the European beef sector

Hocquette, J.F., Legrand, I., Jurie, C., Pethick, D.W. and Micol, D. (2011) Perception in France of the Australian system for the prediction of beef quality (Meat Standards Australia) with perspectives for the European beef sector. Animal Production Science, 51 (1). pp. 30-36.

Link to Published Version: http://dx.doi.org/10.1071/AN10045
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Abstract

Australia has developed the Meat Standards Australia (MSA) grading scheme to predict beef quality for consumers. This system is comprehensive, accurate and scientifically supported. It is based on the development and the use of a research database with a large amount of data, including the use of a large-scale consumer testing system with cuts cooked in different ways as well as information on the corresponding animals, carcasses and cuts. The system is also based on statistical analyses carried out on this database to identify the critical control points of beef palatability which is indicated for individual muscles and for a specific cooking method and aging time. Experts involved in the French beef industry were questioned about their knowledge and views on the application of the MSA system. They recognised many qualities of the MSA system and it was judged as original, relevant and sufficiently mature in its application, and favouring scientifically based prediction of beef quality rather than replying on tradition and perceptions of quality. It was also thought to be credible, flexible and open ended. However, it was still considered to possess some weak points. Thus, while its development in Australia at the farmer and abattoir level has been impressive in a relatively short time, the final delivery of precise quality grades to consumers is still lacking at retail due to only partial implementation of the system. Its adaptability to France would be difficult due to the complexity of the French beef industry and market. But, the program is uniquely innovative and deserves consideration. It will facilitate awareness and induce much needed changes to underpin the preservation and the development of the beef sector in France and eventually in Europe.

Publication Type: Journal Article
Murdoch Affiliation: School of Veterinary and Biomedical Sciences
Publisher: CSIRO Publishing
Copyright: (c) CSIRO
URI: http://researchrepository.murdoch.edu.au/id/eprint/3666
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