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Entrepreneurship and business innovation

Thompson, Alan (2006) Entrepreneurship and business innovation. PhD thesis, Murdoch University.

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      Abstract

      This study has examined the knowledge required for the publication of an Entrepreneurship and Business Innovation (E&BI) focused teaching text. The research design was based on a constructivist, interpretive paradigm, and utilised a qualitative methodology to support the development of a framework and content for a text. Data collection occurred through formal research, discovery and exploration of knowledge rather than verification, and was subject to my interpretation arising from my participation as an academic.

      The analysis of data required a conceptual framework to be developed consistent with the research paradigm, and be so designed as to provide a way for me through a participatory process, to identify and evaluate knowledge in E&BI and investigate the research questions. The study rationalised that E&BI educational programs must first be consistent with, and reflective of, the mission of the institution providing such programs, and also, must address the learning needs of students. Previous research undertaken for this thesis had clearly identified a strong demand for material on E&BI that combined theory and practice with case studies drawn from real world entrepreneurial practices.

      The outcome of this study resulted in the design of a formal text that was suitable for use by secondary, community and adult education institutions within Australia, for delivery to both a digital and print audience and representative of international E&BI good practice. The text 'Entrepreneurship and Business Innovation' was published in 2005.

      The published text was designed to provide new entrepreneurs and existing Small to Medium Enterprise owners with a practical guide on how to pursue business success based on established entrepreneurial and enterprise management techniques. The thesis has explicated the scholarly coherence and originality of the published work, and further places the text within a pedagogical framework.

      Publication Type: Thesis (PhD)
      Murdoch Affiliation: Murdoch Business School
      Supervisor: Entrekin, Lanny
      URI: http://researchrepository.murdoch.edu.au/id/eprint/356
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