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Domestic energy use in Australian cities

Newman, P.W.G. (1982) Domestic energy use in Australian cities. Urban Ecology, 7 (1). pp. 19-38.

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Seven major Australian cities were analysed for their domestic energy consumption in 1976. The results show a wide range in fuels is used in each city with considerable variation between the cities as to which fuels predominate. The potential for increasing the contribution of renewable energy fuels is evidenced by the relatively high consumption of wood fuels in some cities, and by the increasing use of solar water heating in Perth. The latter has occurred despite uncertain economic advantages indicating the considerable inherent appeal of a reliable renewable resource. Per capita variations in domestic energy are very high, ranging from 8.74 GJ in Perth to 26.20 GJ in Hobart. Correlation analysis suggests costs and building structures play only a minor role and that climatic factors, particularly the level of coldness, are the major cause of this variation. Insulation and passive solar design could thus lead to substantial energy conservation. Australian urban domestic energy use, particularly in the warmer cities, appears to be considerably lower than European and North American levels. More detailed energy studies like this on an urban level would make energy planning of greater significance in urban development.

Publication Type: Journal Article
Murdoch Affiliation: School of Environmental and Life Sciences
Publisher: Elsevier
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