Catalog Home Page

Five Years On: What has changed in assurance of learning?

Lawson, R., Scheepers, R., Taylor, T. and Glavas, C. (2015) Five Years On: What has changed in assurance of learning? In: Showcase (HERDSA) 2015, 7th July 2015, Melbourne, Australia.

PDF (Slide Presentation)
Download (480kB) | Preview


Education policies measuring quality in teaching and learning processes and associated discussions have escalated over recent years (Krause, Barrie & Scott, 2012). In Australia, under the Tertiary Education Quality and Standards Agency Act 2011, higher-education providers are responsible to ensure that “Assessment tasks for the course of study and its units provide opportunities for students to demonstrate achievement of the expected student learning outcomes for the course of study” (HESF, 2011:Standard 5.1). This standard aligns with the model of assurance of learning first proposed in the OLT Strategic Priority Project: Hunters and Gatherers: Strategies for Curriculum Mapping and Data Collection for Assurance of Learning (Lawson, Taylor et al, 2014). The empirical basis for the model was a national study of university practices across business schools. Notably, the main challenges for implementation were associated with staff engagement and workload issues; as well as scalability and sustainability of practice. Although mapping of learning outcomes across degrees was reported as common practice, some 60% of respondent institutions had not collected any specific learning outcome data yet.

The OLT Extension Project: Gathering valid data for quality enhancement: assessing, reviewing, benchmarking & closing the loop for assurance of learning in regional universities (Lawson, Scheepers et al, 2015) builds on the earlier ‘Hunters’ findings. The 2015 project investigates supporting assurance of learning by engaging academics and senior faculty managers in valid data collection for quality enhancement. This presentation focuses on a follow up survey on current AOL practice in Australian Universities, targeting Business Schools, and draws on the original project data to enable between project comparisons. Interview data will be analysed using NVIVO to map current trends and good practice, identify ongoing challenges, and compare current practices with the 2010 findings. Key themes will be explored in the session along with the discussion of recommendations for meeting current quality measurement challenges.

Publication Type: Conference Item
Item Control Page Item Control Page


Downloads per month over past year