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Sources of sulfur for dry matter, seed yield, and oil concentration of canola grown in sulfur deficient soils of south-western Australia

Brennan, R.F., Bell, R.W., Raphael, C. and Eslick, H. (2010) Sources of sulfur for dry matter, seed yield, and oil concentration of canola grown in sulfur deficient soils of south-western Australia. Journal of Plant Nutrition, 33 (8). pp. 1180-1194.

Link to Published Version: http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/01904161003763773
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Abstract

Leaching of sulfur (S) on sandy soils may limit the effectiveness of S fertilizers especially when applied at sowing. The effectiveness of S sources for canola (oil seed rape, Brassica napus L.) grown in sandy low S soils of south-western Australia is not known. This study was completed to determine the relative effectiveness of gypsum and a gypsum-based by-product from synthetic rutile processing called Canola Blue for canola grown in low S soils of the region. Canola Blue is a mixture of gypsum and elemental S, and is granulated so its effectiveness may vary from gypsum. We measured the effectiveness of the two S sources in the glasshouse for young seedling growth and for minimizing S leaching. In the four field experiments, the two S sources were evaluated for relative effects on canola seed yield and the concentration of oil in seed. Canola Blue applied at sowing was as effective as gypsum for canola growth in the glasshouse and when applied at 35 days after sowing (DAS) was as effective as gypsum for seed yield in the field. For the glasshouse study, Canola Blue when applied to the soil surface (topdressed) at 35 DAS was as effective as gypsum in achieving a rapid recovery of leaves from S deficiency symptoms and of shoot growth. Where S deficiency appears during the growing season, topdressing with Canola Blue appears to be as effective under the conditions of this experiment as was gypsum. However, the S in Canola Blue was less prone to leaching than that applied as gypsum.

Publication Type: Journal Article
Murdoch Affiliation: School of Environmental Science
Publisher: Marcel Dekker Inc.
Copyright: © Taylor & Francis Group, LLC
URI: http://researchrepository.murdoch.edu.au/id/eprint/3319
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