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Profiling β-thalassaemia mutations in India at state and regional levels: implications for genetic education, screening and counselling programmes

Sinha, S., Black, M.L., Agarwal, S., Colah, R., Das, R., Ryan, K., Bellgard, M. and Bittles, A.H. (2009) Profiling β-thalassaemia mutations in India at state and regional levels: implications for genetic education, screening and counselling programmes. The HUGO Journal, 3 (1-4). pp. 51-62.

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    Link to Published Version: http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s11568-010-9132-3
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    Link to Published Version: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21119755
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    Abstract

    Thalassaemia and sickle cell disease have been recognized by the World Health Organization as important inherited disorders principally impacting on the populations of low income countries. To create a national and regional profile of β-thalassaemia mutations in the population of India, a meta-analysis was conducted on 17 selected studies comprising 8,505 alleles and offering near-national coverage for the disease. At the national level 52 mutations accounted for 97.5% of all β-thalassaemia alleles, with IVSI-5(G>C) the most common disease allele (54.7%). Population stratification was apparent in the mutation profiles at regional level with, for example, the prevalence of IVSI-5(G>C) varying from 44.8% in the North to 71.4% in the East. A number of major mutations, such as Poly A(T>C), were apparently restricted to a particular region of the country, although these findings may in part reflect the variant test protocols adopted by different centres. Given the size and genetic complexity of the Indian population, and with specific mutations for β-thalassaemia known to be strongly associated with individual communities, comprehensive disease registries need to be compiled at state, district and community levels to ensure the efficacy of genetic education, screening and counselling programmes. At the same, time appropriately designed community-based studies are required as a health priority to correct earlier sampling inequities which resulted in the under-representation of many communities, in particular rural and socioeconomically under-privileged groups

    Publication Type: Journal Article
    Murdoch Affiliation: Centre for Comparative Genomics
    Publisher: Springer Verlag
    Copyright: © Springer Science+Business Media B.V.2010.
    URI: http://researchrepository.murdoch.edu.au/id/eprint/3314
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