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Strain- and age-associated variation in viral persistence and antibody response to mouse parvovirus 1 in experimentally infected mice

Filipovska-Naumovska, E., Thompson, M.J., Hopwood, D., Pass, D.A. and Wilcox, G.E. (2010) Strain- and age-associated variation in viral persistence and antibody response to mouse parvovirus 1 in experimentally infected mice. Journal of the American Association for Laboratory Animal Science, 49 (4). pp. 443-447.

Link to Published Version: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC291918...
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Abstract

The effect of mouse strain and age at infection on viral replication and concurrent antibody response to mouse parvovirus 1 (isolate MPV1f) was evaluated for 305 d after inoculation in 4 strains of mice. The results confirmed previous reports that mouse strain and age at infection are significant factors in viral persistence and antibody development and detection. Randombred Arc:Arc(s) mice originally bred from CD1 stock inoculated as juveniles (4 wk) or adults (8 wk) developed persistent viral infection for 152 d after inoculation and an antibody response that persisted for 295 d. Mice of C57BL/6J background inoculated as juveniles had detectable viral DNA in large intestinal content and tissues for 24 d after inoculation and an antibody response that persisted for 288 d. However, viral DNA was not detected in tissues of C57BL/6J mice inoculated as adults, although an antibody was detected for 111 d after inoculation; these results suggest probable viral replication in adult C57BL/6J mice but at levels below the limits of detection. BALB/cArc mice inoculated as juveniles or adults had detectable virus DNA in tissues for 108 to 242 d after inoculation, but no antibody was detected. Similarly, BALB/c-Foxn1 nu/ArC mice had detectable levels of viral DNA in tissues for 98 to 131 d but no measurable antibody. The difficulty of detecting antibody in mice with a BALB/c background indicates they are unsuitable for routine surveillance of MPV1f infection.

Publication Type: Journal Article
Murdoch Affiliation: School of Veterinary and Biomedical Sciences
Publisher: American Association for Laboratory Animal Science
Copyright: 2010 by the American Association for Laboratory Animal Science
URI: http://researchrepository.murdoch.edu.au/id/eprint/3312
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