Catalog Home Page

Microgrid with distributed generators

Yii, See Mee (2009) Microgrid with distributed generators. Other thesis, Murdoch University.

Abstract

The principal aim of this project is to study the energy production by solar energy system in close to the consumers and integrated into a microgrid. Microgrids are small-scale versions of today’s huge centralized electricity system, where it can generate, distribute and regulate the flow of electricity to consumers. Microgrids are able to feature the latest smart technology that increases efficiency and reliability and to create islands of sustainable energy within the larger grid. The main benefits of microgrids are:

•Microgrids increase power supply reliability.
•Microgrids make it easier to efficiently meet growing consumer demand.
•Microgrids make it possible to deploy clean, renewable energy.

The report gives an overview of the generator technologies, and discusses the characteristics of a microgrid and the barriers that have to be overcome if microgrids are to be deployed in Australia. A focus of the study is a microgrid of domestic users (housing estate) powered by photovoltaics (PV). In addition, this project will propose a method to evaluate the reliability of customers contracted with microgrid including distributed generators (DG) and power storage devices.

A model of the energy consumption is used to produce typical profiles for the electricity consumption. Focusing on the balance between generation and load, a methodology has been developed to determine the optimum combination of generators and energy storage in the microgrid. It is found that a microgrid consisting of around 3kW (max peak) per household and 50% reduction of the electricity consumption will maintain energy balance on a yearly basis if supplemented by energy storage. The principle conclusion is that microgrids do have real potential to make a major contribution to reducing Green house Gas Emissions from building.

Publication Type: Thesis (Other)
Murdoch Affiliation: School of Engineering and Energy
Supervisor: Crebbin, Gregory
URI: http://researchrepository.murdoch.edu.au/id/eprint/3250
Item Control Page

Downloads

Downloads per month over past year