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Tabligh Jamaat and Hizbul Tahrir: Divergent paths to convergent goals: education to counter extremism

Ali, A. (2006) Tabligh Jamaat and Hizbul Tahrir: Divergent paths to convergent goals: education to counter extremism. Dialogue & Alliance, 20 (2). pp. 51-66.

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Abstract

Of the known global Islamist organizations in the West, the Tabligh Jama’at (TJ) or the “group for propagating Islam,” founded in 1926 by the Deobandi religious teacher Maulana Muhammad Ilyas Kandhalawi (1885-1944) in Mewat, a town near Delhi in British India;1 and Hizbul Tahrir (HT) or the “Party of Liberation,” founded in 1952 by the Palestinian sheikh Taqi al-Din al-Nabhani (1909-1977), a product of the al-Azhar and Dar ul-Ulum universities in Cairo,2 have more followers today than any of their counterparts. Between the two, TJ is more visible and mass-based than HT and has an unregistered total membership of several millions scattered in almost all countries where there is a significant Muslim community. In the post-9/11 terrorism-counterterrorism debates these two movements, apart from others like al-Qaida and Jamaa Islamiyya, have received focal attention. This paper aims to discuss the socio-political origins of the two movements, the nature and depth of influence they exert in different quarters of the Muslim world, and the prospects of their future growth, particularly in the Western countries.

Publication Type: Journal Article
Publisher: Universal Peace Federation
URI: http://researchrepository.murdoch.edu.au/id/eprint/32332
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