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The prevalence and molecular epidemiology of Serpulina pilosicoli in pigs in the eastern highlands of Papua New Guinea

Durmic, Z., Pethick, D.W., Mullan, B.P., Schulze, H., Accioly, J.M. and Hampson, D.J. (1998) The prevalence and molecular epidemiology of Serpulina pilosicoli in pigs in the eastern highlands of Papua New Guinea. In: 15th International Pig Veterinary Society Congress, 5 - 9 July, Birmingham, UK p. 133.

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Abstract

Serpulina pilosicoli is the causative agent of intestinal spirochaetosis (IS), a diarrhoeic condition characterised by the end-on attachment of the spirochaetes to the epithelium of the large intestine. A previous study of porcine isolates of S. pilosicoli using pulsed field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) indicated a high genetic diversity of isolates, although these were collected from a range of geographical locations (1). Although a number of epidemiological studies of S. pilosicoli in pigs have been made in western countries (2, 3), none have been performed in other regions of the world. An epidemiological study was carried out in the Eastern Highlands Province of Papua New Guinea, in order to determine the epidemiology of S. pilosicoli in villagers and domestic animals. The study centered upon European Large White-Landrace pigs in an intensive commercial piggery, and an indigenous species of pig, Sus scrofa papuensis, which were found in nearby villages, and reared under non-intensive conditions.

Publication Type: Conference Paper
Murdoch Affiliation: School of Veterinary and Biomedical Sciences
URI: http://researchrepository.murdoch.edu.au/id/eprint/31796
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