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Aligning identities, emotions, and beliefs to create commitment to sustainable social and political action

Thomas, E.F., McGarty, C. and Mavor, K.I. (2009) Aligning identities, emotions, and beliefs to create commitment to sustainable social and political action. Personality and Social Psychology Review, 13 (3). pp. 194-218.

Link to Published Version: http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/1088868309341563
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Abstract

In this article the authors explore the social psychological processes underpinning sustainable commitment to a social or political cause. Drawing on recent developments in the collective action, identity formation, and social norm literatures, they advance a new model to understand sustainable commitment to action. The normative alignment model suggests that one solution to promoting ongoing commitment to collective action lies in crafting a social identity with a relevant pattern of norms for emotion, efficacy, and action. Rather than viewing group emotion, collective efficacy, and action as group products, the authors conceptualize norms about these as contributing to a dynamic system of meaning, which can shape ongoing commitment to a cause. By exploring emotion, efficacy, and action as group norms, it allows scholars to reenergize the theoretical connections between collective identification and subjective meaning but also allows for a fresh perspective on complex questions of causality.

Publication Type: Journal Article
Murdoch Affiliation: School of Psychology
Publisher: Sage
Copyright: Society for Personality and Social Psychology
URI: http://researchrepository.murdoch.edu.au/id/eprint/3139
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