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Diversity and capacity to promote maize growth of bacteria isolated from the Amazon region

da Silva, K., Perin, L., Gomes, M.d.L, Barauna, A.C., Pereira, G.M.D., Mosqueira, C.A., da Costa, I.B., O'Hara, G. and Zilli, J.E. (2016) Diversity and capacity to promote maize growth of bacteria isolated from the Amazon region. Acta Amazonica, 46 (2). pp. 111-118.

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Maize plants can establish beneficial associations with plant growth-promoting bacteria. However, few studies have been conducted on the characterization and inoculation of these bacteria in the Amazon region. This study aimed to characterize endophytic bacteria isolated from maize in the Amazon region and to assess their capacity to promote plant growth. Fifty-five bacterial isolates were obtained from maize grown in two types of ecosystems, i.e., a cerrado (savanna) and a forest area. The isolates were characterized by the presence of the nifH gene, their ability to synthesize indole-3-acetic acid (IAA) and solubilize calcium phosphate (CaHPO4), and 16S rRNA partial gene sequencing. Twenty-four bacteria contained the nifH gene, of which seven were isolated from maize plants cultivated in a cerrado area and seventeen from a forest area. Fourteen samples showed the capacity to synthesize IAA and only four solubilized calcium phosphate. The following genera were found among these isolates: Pseudomonas; Acinetobacter; Enterobacter; Pantoea; Burkholderia and Bacillus. In addition, eight isolates with plant growth-promoting capacity were selected for a glasshouse experiment involving the inoculation of two maize genotypes (a hybrid and a variety) grown in pots containing soil. Inoculation promoted the development of the maize plants but no significant interaction between maize cultivar and bacterial inoculation was found. A high diversity of endophytic bacteria is present in the Amazon region and these bacteria have potential to promote the development of maize plants.

Publication Type: Journal Article
Murdoch Affiliation: Centre for Rhizobium Studies
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