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Multiple gene genealogies and microsatellite markers reflect relationships between morphotypes of Sphaeropsis sapinea and distinguish a new species of Diplodia

deWet, J, Burgess, T., Preisig, O., Wingfield, B.D. and Wingfield, M.J. (2003) Multiple gene genealogies and microsatellite markers reflect relationships between morphotypes of Sphaeropsis sapinea and distinguish a new species of Diplodia. Mycological Research, 107 (5). pp. 557-566.

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    Link to Published Version: http://dx.doi.org/10.1017/S0953756203007706
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    Abstract

    Sphaeropsis sapinea is an opportunistic pathogen causing serious damage to conifers, pre-disposed by adverse environmental conditions or mechanical damage. Three different morphological forms of the fungus have been described and are commonly referred to as the A, B and C morphotypes. Isolates of the different morphotypes have also been separated based on differences in pathogenicity and molecular characteristics. These differences, however, overlap and have not been considered sufficiently robust to justify the description of separate taxa. The aim of this study was to consider relationships between isolates representing different S. sapinea morphotypes, using multiple gene genealogies inferred from partial sequences of six protein-coding genes and six microsatellite loci. Genealogies generated for the protein-coding genes and microsatellite loci were not congruent but both consistently grouped isolates representing the A and C morphotypes in separate but closely related clades. In contrast, isolates of the B morphotype grouped together in a clade that was equally different to the A and C morphotypes as it was to the clade encompassing isolates of Botryosphaeria obtusa. These results provide strong evidence to show that the B morphotype isolates are distantly related to S. sapinea and represent a discrete taxon, which we describe here as Diplodia scrobiculata sp. nov.

    Publication Type: Journal Article
    Murdoch Affiliation: School of Biological Sciences and Biotechnology
    Publisher: Cambridge University Press
    Copyright: (c) The British Mycological Society
    URI: http://researchrepository.murdoch.edu.au/id/eprint/3048
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