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Segmenting the MBA Market: An Australian Strategy

Everett, J.E. and Armstrong, R.W. (1990) Segmenting the MBA Market: An Australian Strategy. Journal of Marketing for Higher Education, 3 (1). pp. 151-164.

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This paper discusses segmentation of the potential MBA student market according to demographic criteria, based on the assumption that student success (identified as completion of the degree within five years) is indicative of client satisfaction. The University of Western Australia's MBA program began in 1973. Using the records for this period, demographic variables are tested as predictors of student success. It is found that students who have been admitted without taking the Graduate Management Admissions Test (GMAT) do significantly worse than average, as do those students whose previous degrees were in the professional fields of Medicine, Law and Architecture. Women do less well than men, though this is explained by the facy that a larger percentage of women have been admitted without GMAT scores. It is also found that, for those students admitted to the couse, the GMAT score (except for very high scores) and the years of work experience are not significantly related to success. This result is interpreted as indicating, not that GMAT score and work experience are unrelated to success, but rather that these criteria have been appropriately weighed against other criteria in the selection procedure.

Publication Type: Journal Article
Murdoch Affiliation: School of Business
Publisher: Tayor & Francis
Copyright: Tayor & Francis
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