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The Role of Social Identity Processes in Motivating and Sustaining Volunteerism in Victim Support Organisations

Rathmann, Lisa (2010) The Role of Social Identity Processes in Motivating and Sustaining Volunteerism in Victim Support Organisations. Honours thesis, Murdoch University.

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Abstract

Existing volunteerism research is limited to specific contexts (e.g. AIDS volunteerism), and there is no available research on what motivates and sustains victim support volunteerism. Taking a social identity approach, the current thesis explores the role of personal, social and (volunteer) organisational identity in motivating and sustaining victim support volunteerism. Volunteers (N=99) and non-volunteers (N=l34) completed a questionnaire. In the volunteer sample, social identity as a supporter of victims of crime, outrage and collective efficacy amongst supporters were most strongly associated with intentions to volunteer. Whereas, in the non-volunteer sample, personal identity, sympathy and self efficacy were most strongly associated with intentions to volunteer. Sustained volunteerism was strongly predicted by organisational identity as a volunteer in a victim support organisation and collective efficacy amongst volunteers in victim support organisations. Pride did not predict sustained volunteerism. The study highlighted the role of identification and group-level processes in motivating and sustaining volunteerism. Results are discussed with regards to both theoretical and practical implications for victim support volunteerism.

Publication Type: Thesis (Honours)
Murdoch Affiliation: School of Psychology
Supervisor: Thomas, Emma
URI: http://researchrepository.murdoch.edu.au/id/eprint/29414
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