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The effect of burnt soils on growth of Xanthorrhoea glauca subsp. angustifolia (Xanthorrhoeaceae) seedlings in box-ironbark ecosystems, northern central Victoria

Bellette, M.P., Lawrence, R.E. and Enright, N.J. (2015) The effect of burnt soils on growth of Xanthorrhoea glauca subsp. angustifolia (Xanthorrhoeaceae) seedlings in box-ironbark ecosystems, northern central Victoria. Australian Journal of Botany, 63 (8). pp. 657-663.

Link to Published Version: http://dx.doi.org/10.1071/BT15041
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Abstract

Seedlings of Xanthorrhoea glauca subsp. angustifolia D.J.Bedford (Xanthorrhoeaceae) were grown in burnt, unburnt and ash-rich soils from the box-ironbark ecosystem, northern central Victoria. Analysis of root architecture and the chemistry of leaves and roots demonstrate that burning improves seedling biomass development and acquisition of nutrients. An increased uptake of zinc by seedlings after fire is thought to be ecologically important and may infer vesicular-arbuscular mycorrhizal associations. The early development of a secondary root system is likely to contribute to seedling survivorship. Given the observed high adult mortality after managed fuel-reduction fires, the importance of understanding and manipulating recruitment dynamics through an adaptive and strategic fire management of the remaining populations is likely to define the long-term survival of the species in Victoria.

Publication Type: Journal Article
Murdoch Affiliation: School of Veterinary and Life Sciences
Publisher: CSIRO Publishing
Copyright: © CSIRO 2015.
URI: http://researchrepository.murdoch.edu.au/id/eprint/29384
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