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Foraging ecology and seasonal patterns of abundance in a forest avifauna

Holmes, R.T. and Recher, H.F. (1986) Foraging ecology and seasonal patterns of abundance in a forest avifauna. In: Keast, A., Recher, H.F., Ford, H. and Saunders, D.A., (eds.) Birds of eucalypt forests and woodlands: ecology, conservation, management. Surrey Beatty & Sons in association with the Royal Australasian Ornithologists Union, Chipping Norton, N.S.W., Australia, pp. 79-96.

Abstract

In forests on the Southern Tablelands of New South Wales birds were most abundant and species richness greatest during spring and summer. This coincided with the peak abundance of insects and other foods used by birds. Most species also nested during these months. The majority of the avifauna was insectivorous or nectarivorous. A few species ate seeds or fruits or preyed on other vertebrates. Species often differed in size, habitat, foraging behaviour, the substrates on which prey were located, and foraging heights. Using these differences it is possible to assign species to groups which used the same resources and foraging behaviours. The community organisation developed in this way is useful for understanding how birds use their environment, for determining which resources are important for their survival and for developing plans of management that take wildlife into account.

Publication Type: Book Chapter
Publisher: Surrey Beatty & Sons in association with the Royal Australasian Ornithologists Union
URI: http://researchrepository.murdoch.edu.au/id/eprint/28199
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