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TLR4 stimulation by LPS enhances angiogenesis in a co-culture system consisting of primary human osteoblasts and outgrowth endothelial cells

Ma, B., Dohle, E., Li, M. and Kirkpatrick, C.J. (2015) TLR4 stimulation by LPS enhances angiogenesis in a co-culture system consisting of primary human osteoblasts and outgrowth endothelial cells. Journal of Tissue Engineering and Regenerative Medicine, In press .

Link to Published Version: http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/term.2075
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Abstract

The development of new approaches leading to fast and successful vascularization of tissue-engineered constructs is one of the most intensively studied subjects in tissue engineering and regenerative medicine. Recently, TLR4 activation and LPS stimulation of endothelial cells have been reported to promote angiogenesis in a variety of settings. In this study, we demonstrate that TLR4 activation by Ultrapure LPS Escherichia coli 0111:B4 (LPS-EB) significantly enhances microvessel formation in a co-culture system consisting of outgrowth endothelial cells (OECs) and primary human osteoblasts (pOBs). The precise modes of TLR4 action on the process of angiogenesis have also been investigated in this study. Using quantitative fluorescence microscopy in monocultures of OECs and pOBs, it was found that TLR4 activation through LPS-EB upregulates the expression level of TLR4/MYD88 and enhances both angiogenesis and osteogenesis. Furthermore, ELISA and qRT-PCR have shown that the level of two adhesion molecules (ICAM-1 and E-selectin), two cytokines (IL-6 and IL-8) and two growth factors (VEGF and PDGF-BB) related to angiogenesis increase significantly after LPS-EB treatment. This increased understanding of the role of TLR4 in angiogenesis could be of value in various settings related to tissue repair and tissue engineering. Moreover, since LPS and TLR4 agonists improve angiogenesis and osteogenesis, TLR4 agonists (endogenous or synthetic) could be used for angiogenesis intervention in vivo and therefore could be tested for their potential clinical applications in promoting angiogenesis in bone tissue engineering.

Publication Type: Journal Article
Murdoch Affiliation: School of Veterinary and Life Sciences
Copyright: © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.
URI: http://researchrepository.murdoch.edu.au/id/eprint/27974
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