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Farmers, animal disease reporting and the effect of trust: A study of west australian sheep and cattle farmers

Palmer, S., Sully, M. and Fozdar, F. (2009) Farmers, animal disease reporting and the effect of trust: A study of west australian sheep and cattle farmers. Rural Society, 19 (1). pp. 32-48.

Abstract

Australia has become increasingly vulnerable to infectious animal diseases through the effects of globalisation. As a result, biosecurity - the safeguarding of livestock from disease - has become a key concern of government agriculture departments. Farmers are at the frontline of biosecurity; however, there appears to be only limited understanding of this group's behaviour and motives, particularly what influences their decision to report unusual symptoms in their livestock. This article reports on an investigation prompted by an apparent decline in official reporting of livestock illness and deaths by farmers. A questionnaire measured the biosecurity and reporting practices of Western Australian sheep and cattle farmers in relation to factors such as trust, perceived risk, perceived control and self-efficacy. The findings show that while economic factors play a role in the derision to report, trust in the government is a key factor influencing reporting behaviour.

Publication Type: Journal Article
Murdoch Affiliation: School of Psychology
Publisher: Centre for Rural Social Research
URI: http://researchrepository.murdoch.edu.au/id/eprint/2776
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