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Integration into the Australian Labour Market: The Experience of Three "Visibly Different" Groups of Recently Arrived Refugees

Colic-Peisker, V. and Tilbury, F. (2007) Integration into the Australian Labour Market: The Experience of Three "Visibly Different" Groups of Recently Arrived Refugees. International Migration, 45 (1). pp. 59-85.

Link to Published Version: http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1468-2435.2007.00396.x
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Abstract

This paper explores the effects of "visible difference" on employment outcomes of three recently arrived refugee groups: ex-Yugoslavs, black Africans, and people from the Middle East. The paper draws on data collected through a survey (150 questionnaire-based face-to-face interviews conducted by bilingual interviewers) of refugees who settled in Western Australia over the past decade. Results indicate different outcomes for respondents from the three backgrounds despite similar levels of human capital and similar length of residence. Our evidence supports a "political economy of labour migration" interpretation for the differential outcomes, based on both structural and interpersonal racism, rather than a neo-classical explanation which holds that the job market is "blind to ethnicity". Despite high unemployment and loss of occupational status, predominantly highly educated refugees were relatively satisfied with their lives in Australia.

Publication Type: Journal Article
Murdoch Affiliation: School of Psychology
School of Social Sciences and Humanities
Publisher: Blackwell Publishing Inc.
Copyright: © 2007 IOM.
URI: http://researchrepository.murdoch.edu.au/id/eprint/2761
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