Catalog Home Page

Branchlet shaking: A method for sampling tree canopy arthropods under windy conditions

Majer, J.D., Recher, H. and Keals, N. (1996) Branchlet shaking: A method for sampling tree canopy arthropods under windy conditions. Austral Ecology, 21 (2). pp. 229-234.

Link to Published Version: http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1442-9993.1996.tb00603...
*Subscription may be required
Free to read: http://espace.library.curtin.edu.au/R/?func=dbin-j...
*No subscription required

Abstract

Chemical knockdown is a commonly used method for sampling canopy arthropods. The procedure is susceptible to high winds and in certain conditions may be virtually unusable. Here we introduce a new procedure, branchlet shaking, and compare it with chemical knockdown. Samples produced by branchlet shaking yield fewer arthropods per tree and tend to miss some larger (>1.0cm) and some smaller (<0.2cm) animals. However, the two procedures generally produce data which can portray similar information about the canopy fauna. It is concluded that although chemical knockdown is a superior sampling procedure, branchlet shaking is a possible alternative for situations where chemical knockdown is impractical. Interpretation of the data must, however, take into account the limitations of the branchlet shaking procedure.

Publication Type: Journal Article
Publisher: Blackwell Publishing Inc
URI: http://researchrepository.murdoch.edu.au/id/eprint/27608
Item Control Page Item Control Page