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A chemical analysis of samples of crude glycerol from the production of biodiesel in Australia, and the effects of feeding crude glycerol to growing-finishing pigs on performance, plasma metabolites and meat quality at slaughter

Hansen, C.F., Hernández, A., Mullan, B.P., Moore, K., Trezona-Murray, M., King, R.H. and Pluske, J.R. (2009) A chemical analysis of samples of crude glycerol from the production of biodiesel in Australia, and the effects of feeding crude glycerol to growing-finishing pigs on performance, plasma metabolites and meat quality at slaughter. Animal Production Science, 49 (2). pp. 154-161.

Link to Published Version: http://dx.doi.org/10.1071/EA08210
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Abstract

The aims of this study were to: (i) determine the chemical composition of 11 samples of crude glycerol collected from seven Australian biodiesel manufacturers; and (ii) examine the effects of increasing levels of crude glycerol fed to growing-finishing pigs on performance, plasma metabolites and meat quality at slaughter. Chemical composition of crude glycerol samples varied considerably; glycerol content ranged between 38 and 96%, with some samples containing up to 29% ash and 14% methanol. One of these samples (76.1% glycerol, 1.83% methanol) was then fed to 64 female pigs (50.9 ± 5.55 kg; mean ± s.d.) allocated to one of five dietary treatments (0, 4, 8, 12 and 16% crude glycerol) until they reached 105 kg liveweight. There were no statistical differences in performance indices with increasing levels of added glycerol, although there was an unexpectedly high variation between treatments. Blood glycerol levels were unaffected by diet in week two of the experiment, but increased linearly (P < 0.001) with increasing levels of dietary glycerol before slaughter. The inclusion of crude glycerol did not influence any meat quality parameters at slaughter (P > 0.05). Diets containing added crude glycerol were less dusty after mixing, but diets that contained 8, 12 and 16% glycerol all formed a firm aggregate within 24 h of mixing that presented some feeding difficulties. This might restrict inclusion of glycerol in mash diets to dietary levels less than 8%. Furthermore, levels of residues such as methanol and ash should be monitored to prevent excessive amounts of these compounds in pig diets.

Publication Type: Journal Article
Murdoch Affiliation: Animal Research Institute
School of Veterinary and Biomedical Sciences
Publisher: CSIRO Publishing
Copyright: © CSIRO 2009
URI: http://researchrepository.murdoch.edu.au/id/eprint/2697
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