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Being 'Accountable': TV audiences and surveillance

Miller, T. (2012) Being 'Accountable': TV audiences and surveillance. In: Bolin, G., (ed.) Cultural Technologies The Shaping of Culture in Media and Society. Routledge as part of the Taylor and Francis Group, Abingdon, Oxon, pp. 87-102.


In most societies in which supernatural elements are important in attaining success, some form of divination is practiced, because foreknowledge is one way of control. In parts of East Africa, the entrails of chickens are used for divining the future, while among the Karen of Burma it is the gall bladder of a pig; in Hollywood polls are used to determine the mysterious tastes of the audience. (Powdermaker 1950:285)

We all know the power of television to make us laugh, cry, hide behind the sofa or forget our worries, particularly as we spend more time at home trying to escape the doom and gloom of the credit crunch. To help the nation seek some solace in February, one of the most depressing months, psychologist Donna Dawson has put together her pick of the month's programmes on Sky+HD to help lift your spirits. (Dawson 2009)

TV is still the 800 pound gorilla of media consumption, with viewers glued to their sets over 158 hours per month. In fact, TV viewing has increased more than an hour a day in the last decade, far outpacing any other major media option. ('Data Integration' 2010)

Publication Type: Book Chapter
Publisher: Routledge as part of the Taylor and Francis Group
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