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Individual differences and human computer interaction

Lim, L. and Turk, A. (1999) Individual differences and human computer interaction. In: Western Australian Workshop on Information Systems Research (WAWISR'99), 22 November 1999, Murdoch University, Murdoch, W.A



This paper reports on a study of the significance of individual differences in human computer interaction (HCI). The study examined three aspects of individual differences and their impact on people’s preferences for different types of user interfaces. The hypothesis for the study was that, preferred interface style, preferred operating system and individual work style are expected to be influenced by culture, personal style and other individual attributes. The results of this study demonstrate the complexity of the relationship between individual differences and interface preference. There are considerable differences between the results from this study and those from a similar study by Evers and Day (1997). This indicates that conclusions about interface preferences should not be based on studies with a small sample size. It confirms the need for the collaborative International Study, (being organised by Evers, Turk and others), which will involve a large number of subjects from different countries. This study will contribute its data to the international study and thereby assist in the development of an improved understanding of the role of individual differences in HCI.

Publication Type: Conference Paper
Murdoch Affiliation: School of Information Technology
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