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Impacts of conservation tillage machinery on service provider’s livelihood: A farm level study

Monayem Miah, M.A. and Haque, M.E. (2014) Impacts of conservation tillage machinery on service provider’s livelihood: A farm level study. In: Proceedings of the conference on conservation agriculture for smallholders in Asia and Africa, 7 - 11 December, Mymensingh, Bangladesh pp. 31-32.

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Most tillage operations in Bangladesh are done by power tiller to lower cost and decrrease time required for cultivation (Islam, 2000; Miah, 2000; Barton, 2000; Miah et al., 2002; Haque et al., 2008). The traditional tillage method reduces soil organic carbon at double rate and decreases soil fertility (Grace, 2003), has losses of irrigation water and soils (Sayre and Hobbs, 2003), and damages the ecological environment (Grace, 2003). Therefore, the concept of conservation tillage has arisen all over the world which is new in Bangladesh. A power tiller operated seeder (PTOS) is a two wheel tractor operated seed drill, widely used for establishment of various crops. The sowing of seeds and laddering operations are completed simultaneously in a single pass using PTOS in many areas of Bangladesh. Most of the grain seeds like wheat, paddy, maize, jute, pulses, oilseeds etc are sown in line using PTOS. The owners of PTOS are using this device for their own land cultivation and earning cash income through custom hiring to other farmers. The custom hiring of PTOS is highly profitable at farm level (Miah et al. 2010) and many service providers could improve their livelihood through this machine. The socioeconomic impacts of this popular conservation tillage implement have not been done in the country. Therefore, the present study was conducted to explore the socio-economic profile of the PTOS service providers; to find out the usages pattern and problems of PTOS at service providers’ level; and to determine the impacts of PTOS on the livelihoods of service providers.

Publication Type: Conference Paper
Murdoch Affiliation: School of Veterinary and Life Sciences
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