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Production and consumption of wildlife icons: dolphin tourism at Monkey Mia, Western Australia.

Smith, A.J., Lee, D., Newsome, D. and Stoeckl, N. (2006) Production and consumption of wildlife icons: dolphin tourism at Monkey Mia, Western Australia. In: Meethan, K. and Anderson, A., (eds.) Tourism consumption and representation: narratives of place and self. CABI Publishing, Wallingford, Oxfordshire, UK, pp. 113-139.

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Abstract

This chapter reports on a study supported by Sustainable Tourism Cooperative Research Centre, Australia (STCRC) concerning dolphin tourism at Monkey Mia in Western Australia Smith et al., 2006). Production and consumption of wildlife in terms of tourist space can be discussed through a spectrum of approaches from the anthropocentric form of narrative, where wildlife are viewed only in terms of their value to human kind, through to an ecocentric narrative where wildlife are seen to have their own right to existence. In essence, this represents the range of arguments from those who view wildlife as existing to be packaged and produced for consumption, to those who argue that wildlife should be simply that, and not be made available as a product. Dolphins have been the focus of tourism production and consumption at Monkey Mia since the 1970s, and this chapter endeavours to explore management of the conflict between preservation and use, and examine conservation management in this case undertaken by the Midwest Region of Conservation and Land Management (CALM), as a means to provide optimum outcomes for both wildlife and human life. Conservation seeks to balance the potential conflict and tensions between anthropocentric and ecocentric approaches.

Publication Type: Book Chapter
Murdoch Affiliation: School of Environmental Science
Publisher: CABI Publishing
Copyright: (c) CABI
URI: http://researchrepository.murdoch.edu.au/id/eprint/2587
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