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Design and analysis of feedback controllers for a DC buck-boost converter

Chan, Jason (2014) Design and analysis of feedback controllers for a DC buck-boost converter. Other thesis, Murdoch University.

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In Murdoch University, students majoring in Electrical Power Engineering have the opportunity to learn about the basics of power electronic systems. ENG349 Power Electronic Converters and Systems is a unit where students are exposed to a range of industrial electronics. The power pole board provided by the University of Minnesota is used for laboratory teaching on how DC converters operate [1, 2]. This thesis topic gives an opportunity for Electrical Power students to further expand their basic knowledge on power electronics.

Additionally, Instrumentation and Control System Engineering students will have a better understanding of dynamic control systems, which are essential in designing and analysing feedback control on DC converters. Industrial computer systems students are able to design and implement external hardware to enhance power board components. Renewable Energy students will be interested in how DC converters are applied to renewable energy systems. This thesis provides project expansion for all types of electrical engineering majors taught at Murdoch University.

The main focus of this thesis is to design and analyse different feedback controllers for the converter system. The literature review and steps into designing feedback controllers are adapted from Ned Mohan’s approach in designing feedback controllers for DC converters [3]. The results presented are based on the author’s knowledge learnt from Electrical Power and Instrumentation and Control Systems Engineering.

Computer simulations from Pspice and MATLAB are used for testing the feedback responses of implementing different feedback compensators. The most difficult task in this thesis is to produce accurate results from the power pole board, especially with the peak current controller circuit. Although the simulated results are successful, it is hard to compare these to the experimental results due to the ways of how the power board components are connected. This thesis will further explain the process in exploring these feedback controllers.

Publication Type: Thesis (Other)
Murdoch Affiliation: School of Engineering and Information Technology
Supervisor: Calais, Martina and Glenister, Simon
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