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To build a gaming human interface device, designed for those with limited dexterity

Van't Sant, Daniel (2014) To build a gaming human interface device, designed for those with limited dexterity. Other thesis, Murdoch University.

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Abstract

With the competition in the games market focus is placed on entertaining the user for the sale of their products. This brings entertainment to the safe environment of the home. To play these games the user needs to use a keyboard and mouse.

For somebody without finger dexterity and limited arm movement, pressing keys on the keyboard is impossible without pressing other keys at the same time. The mouse is also impossible to use.

This project involves the design of a wireless controller made for an individual who has no finger dexterity, limited arm movement and has access to an optical head tracker to move the mouse cursor. The inputs are done by buttons and joysticks. The project requires careful design and testing to ensure the inputs can be operated by this individual.

The average time spent comfortably playing on the game controller was four hours. The delay coming from the controller was not noticeable for all the button presses. The processing time to do a key press by the controller was tested to be less than thirty two milliseconds. The battery that is in the controller will last for 16 hours of gameplay. The controller is mostly operated by the user so that less work is done by the carers. The only other method of playing games before the controller was to have a pointer glued into his splint. This could then be used to operate the mobile phone by using the pointer on the touch screen. The user found that computer gaming is more entertaining than playing games on a mobile phone.

Publication Type: Thesis (Other)
Murdoch Affiliation: School of Engineering and Information Technology
Supervisor: Lee, Gareth
URI: http://researchrepository.murdoch.edu.au/id/eprint/25554
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