Catalog Home Page

Sequence variation and immunologic cross-reactivity among Babesia bovis merozoite surface antigen 1 proteins from vaccine strains and vaccine breakthrough isolates

LeRoith, T., Brayton, K.A., Molloy, J.B., Bock, R.E., Hines, S.A., Lew, A.E. and McElwain, T.F. (2005) Sequence variation and immunologic cross-reactivity among Babesia bovis merozoite surface antigen 1 proteins from vaccine strains and vaccine breakthrough isolates. Infection and Immunity, 73 (9). pp. 5388-5394.

[img]
Preview
PDF - Published Version
Download (890kB)
Link to Published Version: http://dx.doi.org/10.1128/IAI.73.9.5388-5394.2005
*Subscription may be required

Abstract

The Babesia bovis merozoite surface antigen 1 (MSA-1) is an immunodominant membrane glycoprotein that is the target of invasion-blocking antibodies. While antigenic variation has been demonstrated in MSA-1 among strains from distinct geographical areas, the extent of sequence variation within a region where it is endemic and the effect of variation on immunologic cross-reactivity have not been assessed. In this study, sequencing of MSA-1 from two Australian B. bovis vaccine strains and 14 breakthrough isolates from vaccinated animals demonstrated low sequence identity in the extracellular region of the molecule, ranging from 19.8 to 46.7% between the T vaccine strain and eight T vaccine breakthrough isolates, and from 18.7 to 99% between the K vaccine strain and six K vaccine breakthrough isolates. Although MSA-1 amino acid sequence varied substantially among strains, overall predicted regions of hydrophilicity and hydrophobicity in the extracellular domain were conserved in all strains examined, suggesting a conserved functional role for MSA-1 despite sequence polymorphism. Importantly, the antigenic variation created by sequence differences resulted in a lack of immunologic cross-reactivity among outbreak strains using sera from animals infected with the B. bovis vaccine strains. Additionally, sera from cattle hyperinfected with the Mexico strain of B. bovis and shown to be clinically immune did not cross-react with MSA-1 from any other isolate tested. The results indicate that isolates of B. bovis capable of evading vaccine-induced immunity contain an msa-1 gene that is significantly different from the msa-1 of the vaccine strain, and that the difference can result in a complete lack of cross-reactivity between MSA-1 from vaccine and breakthrough strains in immunized animals.

Publication Type: Journal Article
Publisher: American Society for Microbiology
Copyright: 2005 American Society for Microbiology
URI: http://researchrepository.murdoch.edu.au/id/eprint/25362
Item Control Page Item Control Page

Downloads

Downloads per month over past year