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Prevalence and characteristics of aggression and violence experienced by Western Australian nursing students during clinical practice

Hopkins, M., Fetherston, C.M. and Morrison, P. (2014) Prevalence and characteristics of aggression and violence experienced by Western Australian nursing students during clinical practice. Contemporary Nurse, 49 (1). pp. 113-121.

Link to Published Version: http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/10376178.2014.11081961
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Abstract

To identify the prevalence and characteristics of aggression and violence experienced by undergraduate nursing students in the clinical setting. Method: A cross sectional survey of second (N = 97) and third (N = 56) year nursing students in a Western Australian University was conducted. Data were analysed using frequencies, percentages and means (standard deviation) and independent samples t-test for between group differences. Results: Over 58% (N = 55) of second year and 57% (N = 32) of third year nursing students experienced some kind of non-physical violence. Various forms of physical violence were also reported by over a third (N = 33) of the second year and 25% (N = 18) of the third year nursing students. Conclusion: This study has identified nursing students are exposed to, and feel at significant risk of, aggression and violence in the clinical setting. Providing them with an appropriate level of knowledge and self-confidence to assist in the management of the threat and actuality of such incidents is essential.

Publication Type: Journal Article
Murdoch Affiliation: School of Health Professions
Publisher: eContent Management Pty Ltd
Copyright: © 2014 eContent Management Pty Ltd.
URI: http://researchrepository.murdoch.edu.au/id/eprint/25217
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