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A comparison of the profitability of farming systems using wool and wool/meat sheep genotypes in South-West Victoria

Thompson, A.N. and Young, J.M. (2002) A comparison of the profitability of farming systems using wool and wool/meat sheep genotypes in South-West Victoria. Wool Technology and Sheep Breeding, 50 (4). pp. 615-621.

Abstract

Low wool prices and high sheep-meat prices have generated interest in selection of Merino sheep that have high genetic capacity for wool and meat traits. This paper describes an analysis comparing a traditional fine-wool growing enterprise ("Wool") with one focused on wool and meat production ("Wool/Meat") in south-west Victoria. The two systems were modelled using the computer program MIDAS, and profitability was calculated for a range of commodity prices and production levels. The standard production levels for the "Wool" and "Wool/Meat" sheep genotypes was assumed to be 3.2 and 4.0kg clean fleece weight, 19.6 and 21.0μm, and 75% and 110% weaning rate, respectively. With these production levels, the "Wool/Meat" genotype was more profitable than "Wool" over a broad range of wool and meat prices. Alternatively, the "Wool/Meat" sheep genotype only needed to produce 350g more wool per ewe, be no more than 2.0μm broader or produce 14% more lambs to be as profitable as the "Wool" sheep genotype.

Publication Type: Journal Article
Publisher: Wool Research Organisation of New Zealand Inc.
URI: http://researchrepository.murdoch.edu.au/id/eprint/25177
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