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Hydatid disease in urban areas of Western Australia: an unusual cycle involving western grey kangaroos (Macropus fuliginosus), feral pigs and domestic dogs

Thompson, R.C.A., Lymbery, A.J., Hobbs, R.P. and Elliot, A. (1988) Hydatid disease in urban areas of Western Australia: an unusual cycle involving western grey kangaroos (Macropus fuliginosus), feral pigs and domestic dogs. Australian Veterinary Journal, 65 (6). pp. 188-190.

Link to Published Version: http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1751-0813.1988.tb14298...
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Abstract

Hydatid disease has been considered to be uncommon in Western Australia (Kumaratilake and Thompson 1982). Past studies of the overall state prevalence in sheep and cattle revealed levels of 0.04% and 0.3% respectively between 1965-67 (Austen 1967) and 0.06% and 1% between 1967-71 (Thompson 1979). However, prevalence was higher in the more temperate south-west of the state where between 2.1% and 2.6% of cattle were found to be infected (Austen 1967; Kumaratilake and Thompson 1982). We have been surveying Western Australian livestock in collaboration with the Department of Primary Industry. Between 1985 and 1987 there has been little change overall, with the statewide prevalence of infection being 0.8% in cattle and 0.2% in sheep. Recently, we received viable hydatid cysts from a western grey kangaroo (Macropus fuliginosus) shot close to Perth. This finding prompted the present survey of the prevalence of hydatid infection in kangaroos and feral pigs close to Perth, and strain characterisation of the causative agent(s).

Publication Type: Journal Article
Murdoch Affiliation: School of Veterinary Studies
Publisher: Wiley-Blackwell
URI: http://researchrepository.murdoch.edu.au/id/eprint/2510
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