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In vitro research with difficult to propagate Cyperaceae spp for ecological restoration of post-mined landscapes in a biodiverse region (south-west Western Australia)

Panaia, M., Bunn, E. and McComb, J. (2009) In vitro research with difficult to propagate Cyperaceae spp for ecological restoration of post-mined landscapes in a biodiverse region (south-west Western Australia). In: 19th Conference of the Society of Ecological Restoration International, 24 - 26 August, Perth, Western Australia.

Abstract

Restoration of native vegetation in species rich regions such as Western Australia is often hampered by extreme difficulties in securing sufficient viable seed and dealing with various types of intractable dormancy. Similarly vegetative propagation can be very difficult or virtually impossible with some species and direct transplanting poses unacceptable risks with spread of serious soil-borne diseases (e.g. Phytophthora cinnamomi). Not surprisingly options for propagation and restoration of many species are very limited, hence aspirations for full restoration of original plant biodiversity after mining for example are often thwarted. We report on research undertaken at Kings Park and Botanic Garden into in vitro propagation (featuring somatic embryogenesis) as a valuable tool for mass propagation of highly recalcitrant native plants (with applications to threatened and horticultural taxa), illustrated by evidence for successful translocation of study species to restoration sites. Somatic embryogenesis has been highly successful with Baloskyon tetraphyllum (Restionaceae) and Lepidosperma drummondii (Cyperaceae) and significant progress achieved with micropropagation and somatic embryogenesis of L. squamatum, Tetraria octandra and T. capillaris (Cyperaceae). Whole plants of all four species have been successfully grown from in vitro cultured shoots derived from either shoot cultures and/or somatic embryos. Plants of L. drummondii, T. capillaris and T. octandra derived from somatic embryos have been successfully planted and have survived in field sites, indicating that mass propagation in vitro is a feasible alternative system for production of difficult-to-propagate Cyperaceae spp. for restoration in biodiverse ecosystems following mining activities.

Publication Type: Conference Item
Murdoch Affiliation: School of Biological Sciences and Biotechnology
URI: http://researchrepository.murdoch.edu.au/id/eprint/24508
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