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Sustainable management of plantation eucalypts and acacias in Asia

Dell, B. and Thu, P.Q. (2008) Sustainable management of plantation eucalypts and acacias in Asia. In: The FORTROP II Conference: Tropical Forestry Change in a Changing World, 17 - 20 November, Kasetsart University Bangkok, Thailand pp. 49-66.



The long-term productivity of short-rotation plantation eucalypts and acacias in Asia requires ongoing investment in the biology of current and new genetics and constraints that climate change may impose. Understanding site fertility constraints has the potential to further lift productivity through precision application of inorganic fertilizers, management of beneficial bacteria and fungi and appropriate slash management. It remains a concern that nutrient disorders, especially micronutrients, which could be easily corrected in acid soils, are still being widely reported in the region. The low genetic diversity in many plantations heightens the risk of productivity loss due to incursions of pathogens and pests. In the past decade, a number of new biotic eucalypt threats have appeared within the region and are rapidly spreading. No plantation estate can be considered to be risk-free from such incursions. Furthermore, abiotic stresses (e.g. water, nutrients) are likely to exacerbate damage from biotic agents. With climate change, plantations established on marginal lands and sites with poor soils are likely to experience stresses that are more frequent and a more diverse group of stress agents than those in areas that are more resilient to climate change. Future breeding programs should include selection for tolerance to key abiotic and biotic stress agents that have the highest risk to plantation productivity.

Publication Type: Conference Paper
Murdoch Affiliation: Centre of Excellence for Climate Change and Forest and Woodland Health
Publisher: Forest Industry Organization, Suan Kitti Alliance Group and Kasetsart University Faculty of Forestry
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