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The use of sentinel plantings in forest biosecurity; results from mixed eucalypt species trails in South‐East Asia and Australia

Burgess, T.I., Dell, B., Hardy, G.E.St.J. and Thu, P. (2009) The use of sentinel plantings in forest biosecurity; results from mixed eucalypt species trails in South‐East Asia and Australia. In: APPS 2009 Plant Health Management: An Integrated Approach, 29 Sept - 1 Oct, Newcastle p. 111.

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    Abstract

    Many diseases of Eucalyptus species have emerged as pathogens in exotic plantations. Guava rust (Puccinia psidii), cryphonectria canker (Crysoporthe cubensis) coniotherium canker (Colletogloeopsis zuluensis) and Kirramyces leaf blight (Kirramyces destructans) are all serious pathogens that have not been found in native forests or in plantations in Australia (Burgess & Wingfield 2002; Cortinas et al. 2006; Glen et al. 2007; Wingfield et al. 2001). The susceptibility to these pathogens of Eucalyptus spp. commonly used in exotic plantations is known; however the susceptibility of many Eucalyptus spp. found only in natural ecosystems in Australia is unknown. There are two main uses of sentinel plantations. Firstly, tree species known to be susceptible to different pathogens can be planted within the natural environment to try and trap pathogens from their surroundings. In Australia, taxa trials planted in different environments act as sentinel plantings. By surveying these taxa trials we have collected and described a number of new eucalypt pathogens and reported the presence in Australia of Kirramyces destructans. The second use for sentinel planting is where many tree species are planted in a region known to harbour certain pathogens. In this manner the susceptibility of the different tree species can be determined.

    Publication Type: Conference Paper
    Murdoch Affiliation: School of Biological Sciences and Biotechnology
    URI: http://researchrepository.murdoch.edu.au/id/eprint/2391
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