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Exhausting the city: implications of land use and transport in Perth, Australia

Falconer, R., Giles-Corti, B. and Lyons, T.J. (2007) Exhausting the city: implications of land use and transport in Perth, Australia. World Transport Policy & Practice, 13 (2). pp. 78-105.

Abstract

This article describes how post-World War Two (WWII) planning in major Australian cities was based on the United States model. The authors use Perth (Australia) as a case to describe how this model results in segregated zoning, low development densities and car dependence. Car dependence is in turn linked to dependence on fossil fuels for transport energy as well as detrimental public health consequences. The authors incorporate the concept of transportation sustainability to explain how conventional planning outcomes and preferential car use are increasingly considered to be unsustainable. They describe the use of new planning projects, such as Perth’s “Liveable Neighbourhoods” (LN) and behavior change strategies, such as Travel Smart, and how they are being applied. These policy approaches are tailored to the Perth context although they share principles with other measures for reform, such as Smart Growth. The authors conclude by calling for research to support land use policy changes in cities such as Perth.

Publication Type: Journal Article
Murdoch Affiliation: School of Environmental Science
Publisher: Eco-Logica Limited
Publishers Website: http://www.eco-logica.co.uk/worldtransport.html
URI: http://researchrepository.murdoch.edu.au/id/eprint/2373
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