Catalog Home Page

Justification for genetic improvement in growth rates of black bream (Acanthopagrus butcheri): A partial budgeting analysis

Doupé, R.G. and Lymbery, A.J. (2002) Justification for genetic improvement in growth rates of black bream (Acanthopagrus butcheri): A partial budgeting analysis. Aquaculture Economics & Management, 6 (5). pp. 339-348.

Link to Published Version: http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/13657300209380323
*Subscription may be required

Abstract

Black bream (Acanthopagrus butcheri) appear an ideal candidate for the developing saline aquaculture industry of inland Western Australia. However, current maximum growth rates of 150g/annum are too slow for profitable production. This study investigated whether enhanced growth rates of black bream would improve profitability and justify a genetic improvement program. A partial budget analysis was conducted for two different fish production systems; a commercial operation that incurred more operating expenses due to costs associated with farm initiation (stand-alone farm model), and an existing farm that diversified into aquaculture using the saline water resources of established farm dams (integrated farm model). Sensitivity analyses indicated that a 33 per cent increase in growth rate to at least 200g/annum would allow either production system to return a profit at a farm-gate price of AUS$6/kg whole fish, with fish survival rates of 98 per cent for the stand-alone farm, and 65 per cent for the integrated farm model. These results are discussed in the context of the genetic and economic consequences of selection for improved growth rates, and for developing breeding objectives and a genetic improvement program for black bream.

Publication Type: Journal Article
Murdoch Affiliation: School of Veterinary and Biomedical Sciences
Publisher: International Association of Aquaculture Economics & Management
URI: http://researchrepository.murdoch.edu.au/id/eprint/2296
Item Control Page