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Investigation of a swimming pool-associated cryptosporidiosis outbreak in the Kimberley region of Western Australia

Ng-Hublin, J.S.Y., Hargrave, D., Combs, B. and Ryan, U. (2015) Investigation of a swimming pool-associated cryptosporidiosis outbreak in the Kimberley region of Western Australia. Epidemiology and Infection, 143 (5). pp. 1037-1040.

Link to Published Version: http://dx.doi.org/10.1017/S095026881400106X
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Abstract

Cryptosporidiosis is a gastroenteric disease caused by the protozoan parasite Cryptosporidium, which manifests primarily as watery diarrhoea. Transmitted via the faecal-oral route, infection with the parasite can occur through ingestion of water, food or other fomites contaminated with its infective oocyst stage. In the months of November and December 2012, there were 18 notified cases of cryptosporidiosis from Broome, Western Australia. The 5-year average for the Kimberley region for this period is <1 case. Interviews conducted by Broome local government staff on the notified cases revealed that 11/18 cases had been swimming at the Broome public swimming pool. Molecular analyses of extracted DNA performed on 8/18 microscopy-positive faecal samples from interviewed cases and three water samples from different locations at the hypervariable glycoprotein 60 (gp60) gene, identified the C. hominis IbA10G2 subtype in all human samples and one water sample

Publication Type: Journal Article
Murdoch Affiliation: School of Veterinary and Life Sciences
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Copyright: © Cambridge University Press 2014
URI: http://researchrepository.murdoch.edu.au/id/eprint/22938
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