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The colonial religion of the Anglican clergy: Western Australia 1830 to c. 1870

Strong, R. (2014) The colonial religion of the Anglican clergy: Western Australia 1830 to c. 1870. Journal of Religious History, 38 (1). pp. 91-114.

Link to Published Version: http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/1467-9809.12137
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Abstract

This article sets out to remedy an historiographical oversight in Australian history by identifying the principal characteristics of the religious culture of Anglican clergy in the colony of Western Australia between 1830 and about 1870. Using sources, both personal from clergy or clergy wives, and official correspondence with the colonial governments, and clergy correspondence to mission societies and their bishop, a number of features of clergy religion are delineated. They enable a comparison to be made between metropolitan and colonial Anglican clergy cultures. These include anxieties about status and income; the involvement of the clergy in charity, education, church building, and public worship; isolation and religious competition. While many of these were familiar to English clergy, they took on new aspects in the colonial context, which required the clergy there to become conscious that the colony was a new land, however much they attempted to remake it in their own ecclesiastical image.

Publication Type: Journal Article
Murdoch Affiliation: School of Arts
Publisher: Blackwell Publishing
Copyright: © 2014 The Author
URI: http://researchrepository.murdoch.edu.au/id/eprint/21953
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