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Mining and Communities: Understanding the Context of Engineering Practice

Armstrong, R., Baillie, C. and Cumming-Potvin, W. (2014) Mining and Communities: Understanding the Context of Engineering Practice. Morgan & Claypool Publishers, pp. 1-148.

Link to Published Version: http://dx.doi.org/10.2200/S00564ED1V01Y201401ETS02...
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Abstract

Mining has been entangled with the development of communities in all continents since the beginning of large-scale resource extraction. It has brought great wealth and prosperity, as well as great misery and environmental destruction. Today, there is a greater awareness of the urgent need for engineers to meet the challenge of extracting declining mineral resources more efficiently, with positive and equitable social impact and minimal environmental impact. Many engineering disciplines—from software to civil engineering—play a role in the life of a mine, from its inception and planning to its operation and final closure. The companies that employ these engineers are expected to uphold human rights, address community needs, and be socially responsible. While many believe it is possible for mines to make a profit and achieve these goals simultaneously, others believe that these are contradictory aims. This book narrates the social experience of mining in two very different settings—Papua New Guinea and Western Australia—to illustrate how political, economic, and cultural contexts can complicate the simple idea of "community engagement."

Publication Type: Book
Murdoch Affiliation: School of Education
Publisher: Morgan & Claypool Publishers
Copyright: 2014 Morgan & Claypool
Notes: Series: Synthesis Lectures Title on Engineers, Technology, and Science #21
URI: http://researchrepository.murdoch.edu.au/id/eprint/21939
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