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Canker disease of marri ( Corymbia calophylla) in the south west of Western Australia

Paap, T., McComb, J., Shearer, B. and Hardy, G.E.St.J. (2003) Canker disease of marri ( Corymbia calophylla) in the south west of Western Australia. In: 8th International Congress of Plant Pathology: Solving problems in the real world, (ICPP 2003), 2 - 7 February, Christchurch; New Zealand.

Abstract

Cankering of marri in the southern forest of Western Australia is causing concern as it is increasing considerably in severity and geographic range. The causal agent(s) is yet to be determined. Samples of tissue were collected from lesion margins of cankered trees in state forest and on private property in Brunswick Junction, Perup and Balingup. Samples were surface sterilised and plated onto PDA, and pure cultures obtained were identified. Fungi most frequently associated with marri cankers were C. eucalypticola, Endothiella sp and Favostroma sp. Ten saplings at Jarrahdale were underbark inoculated with isolates of Cytospora eucalypticola, Endothiella sp., or Favostroma sp. Isolates of Endothiella sp. and Cytospora sp. caused significantly long and wide lesions over a period of four months, and one of the two Favostroma sp. isolates caused significantly long but not wide lesions. There were significant differences in the pathogenicity of Endothiella sp. isolates with one isolate causing lesions up to 20 cm long, and girdling marri stems (65 mm mean circumference) in four of the ten replicates. It is possible that these fungi may be more pathogenic to trees under stress, and there is a pressing need for further research into the cause and extent of the organism( s) responsible for marri decline and death.

Publication Type: Conference Item
Murdoch Affiliation: School of Biological Sciences and Biotechnology
Publisher: Horticulture Australia
URI: http://researchrepository.murdoch.edu.au/id/eprint/21259
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