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The effects of scopolamine upon verbal memory: evidence for an attentional hypothesis

Dunne, M.P. and Hartley, L.R. (1985) The effects of scopolamine upon verbal memory: evidence for an attentional hypothesis. Acta Psychologica, 58 (3). pp. 205-217.

Link to Published Version: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/0001-6918(85)90020-4
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Abstract

Immediate and delayed free recall and recognition of dichotically presented lists of nouns were assessed in a group of normal female volunteers following oral administration of either a placebo or 0.6 mg scopolamine hydrobromide. Results show that, while there was no drug effect upon total (i.e., attended plus unattended) recall, there was a significant drug by attention interaction, in that recall for attended words was impaired while unattended recall was facilitated. There were no drug effects upon recognition performance. It was concluded that scopolamine acts to modulate selective attention rather than memory consolidation processes, and it is suggested that the cholinergic system may be centrally involved in the control of effortful or intentional processing in memory.

Publication Type: Journal Article
Murdoch Affiliation: School of Psychology
Publisher: Elsevier
URI: http://researchrepository.murdoch.edu.au/id/eprint/20975
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