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Smart metering for residential energy efficiency: The use of community based social marketing for behavioural change and smart grid introduction

Anda, M. and Temmen, J. (2014) Smart metering for residential energy efficiency: The use of community based social marketing for behavioural change and smart grid introduction. Renewable Energy, 67 . pp. 119-127.

Link to Published Version: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.renene.2013.11.020
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Abstract

Community-based social marketing (CBSM) has shown to be very effective at inducing behavioural change due to its pragmatic approach. It has been found that nonintegrated intensive approaches towards changing individual's behaviour, such as education and economic self-interest are not successful. This paper will explain how a large urban electricity meter replacement program can achieve a reduction in peak demand and overall energy consumption through the use of advanced metering infrastructure (AMI or 'smart meters') coupled with CBSM, which in turn enables the progression towards a 'smart grid'. In order to measure success the following targets were set: • Peak demand reduction (peak lopping) of 20% from the households participating in the Behaviour Change Programs (BCPs). • Peak demand shifting (load shifting) to reduce energy consumption during 'super peak' by 10% in BCP participating households. • Average total energy use reduction of 10% in BCP participating households. The energy efficiency actions discussed with householders during eco-coaching, and other feedback communications, are identified by utilising the information regarding barriers and benefits generated from the research phase prior to coaching. These actions can include referral to other initiatives such as the provision of reduced cost solar PV power systems, direct load control devices for domestic air-conditioners, the time-of-use pricing product, the provision of in-home-displays (IHD) and other devices necessary for development of a 'smart grid'.

Publication Type: Journal Article
Murdoch Affiliation: School of Veterinary and Life Sciences
Publisher: Elsevier BV
Copyright: © 2013 Elsevier Ltd.
URI: http://researchrepository.murdoch.edu.au/id/eprint/20320
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