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The effect of rapid induction analgesia on subjective pain ratings and pain tolerance

Wright, B. and Drummond, P.D. (2001) The effect of rapid induction analgesia on subjective pain ratings and pain tolerance. International Journal of Clinical and Experimental Hypnosis, 49 (2). pp. 109-122.

Link to Published Version: http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/00207140108410062
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Abstract

Abstract
The effect of Rapid Induction Analgesia (RIA) on pain tolerance and ratings of mechanically induced pain in the pain-sensitized forearm was investigated in 58 undergraduates. Posthypnotic suggestions of relaxation and analgesia did not influence pain ratings or tolerance, but relaxation ratings increased after RIA. When suggestions for analgesia were made throughout pain testing, ratings of pain unpleasantness at the pain tolerance point decreased more in the RIA group than in the attention control group. However, RIA did not influence pain threshold or tolerance. It was concluded that RIA was more effective in reducing subjective reports of pain (particularly the affective component) than in altering pain tolerance, and that maintenance of hypnotic suggestions was more effective than posthypnotic suggestions of comfort and relaxation in alleviating the affective component of pain.

Publication Type: Journal Article
Murdoch Affiliation: School of Psychology
Publisher: Routledge
Copyright: 2001 The International Journal of Clinical and Experimental Hypnosis
URI: http://researchrepository.murdoch.edu.au/id/eprint/2029
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