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Training for an agricultural discrimination task

Hartley, L.R., Higgins, T., MacLeod, C. and Arnold, P.K. (1990) Training for an agricultural discrimination task. Applied Ergonomics, 21 (2). pp. 152-156.

Link to Published Version: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/0003-6870(90)90138-N
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Abstract

Skeleton weed, centaurea juncea, is a declared weed in Western Australia because it competes with grain crops for nutrients and moisture. When it is found during harvesting, mechanised teams search and eradicate it. In an earlier report of field trials (Hartley et al, 1989) it was reported that search teams' detection rate was poor and since search teams had usually never seen skeleton weeds, visual discrimination learning was to be expected and observed during searches. The present study investigated the nature of this discrimination learning in a laboratory by developing a training programme of colour photographic slides of weeds in stubble. Subjects receiving specific training with feedback on their performance compared with those receiving pseudo-training showed a significant improvement in detections. Subsequently the benefit of the programme was validated in a field trial.

Publication Type: Journal Article
Murdoch Affiliation: School of Psychology
Publisher: Elsevier Ltd
Copyright: © 1990 Published by Elsevier Ltd.
URI: http://researchrepository.murdoch.edu.au/id/eprint/20282
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