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4-aminobutyrate is not available to bacteroids of cowpea Rhizobium MNF2030 in snake bean nodules

Jin, H.N., Dilworth, M.J. and Glenn, A.R. (1990) 4-aminobutyrate is not available to bacteroids of cowpea Rhizobium MNF2030 in snake bean nodules. Archives of Microbiology, 153 (5). pp. 455-462.

Link to Published Version: http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/BF00248427
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Abstract

Laboratory cultures of cowpea Rhizobium MNF2030 grew on 4-aminobutyrate (GABA) as sole source of carbon and nitrogen. GABA transport was active since it was inhibited by carbonyl cyanide m-chlorophenyl hydrazone and 2,4-dinitrophenol and cells developed a 400-fold concentration gradient across the cell membrane. Arsenite treatment of GABA-grown cells revealed stoichiometric conversion of GABA to pyruvate, indicating that 2-oxoglutarate is not an intermediate in GABA catabolism. GABA catabolism by cells of strain MNF2030 grown on GABA appeared to involve GABA transaminase, succinic semialdehyde dehydrogenase and malic enzyme; the first two enzymes were specifically induced by growth on GABA. The deamination process and removal of NH3 in cells catabolizing GABA involved GABA:2-oxoglutarate transaminase; glutamate: oxaloacetate aminotransferase; asparate:pyruvate aminotransferase and alanine dehydrogenase. Isolated snakebean bacteroids of strain MNF2030 transported only small amounts of GABA and had uninduced levels of GABA catabolic enzymes, even though the nodules contained significant levels of GABA. The data suggest that GABA is not available to snakebean nodule bacteroids, presumably because of a control imposed by the peribacteroid membrane.

Publication Type: Journal Article
Murdoch Affiliation: School of Biological and Environmental Sciences
Publisher: Springer Verlag
URI: http://researchrepository.murdoch.edu.au/id/eprint/20207
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