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Characterisation of patients with cirrhosis in a tertiary hospital general hepatology clinic

Singh, A., Ayonrinde, O.T., Galhenage, S. and Olynyk, J.K. (2011) Characterisation of patients with cirrhosis in a tertiary hospital general hepatology clinic. In: Australian Gastroenterology Week 2011, 12 - 15 September 2011, Brisbane Convention & Exhibition Centre, Brisbane.

Abstract

The burden of chronic liver disease resulting from alcohol, chronic hepatitis C infection (CHC), Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease and chronic hepatitis B infection (CHB) is expected to rise in Australian. We determined the patient characteristics, aetiologies, severity and management of patients with cirrhosis attending a tertiary hospital general hepatology clinic. Methods Patients with cirrhosis attending the hepatology clinic between 2006 and 2011 were identified from the clinic database. Descriptive demographic data, clinical, laboratory and radiological data were recorded. The aetiology of cirrhosis was defined as best possible from available data. Results Two hundred and ninety-nine patients were diagnosed with cirrhosis. More males (69.6%) had cirrhosis compared with females (34.4%). The mean age was similar between genders 55.1 (SD 10.6) years for males and 57.4 (SD 12.5) years for females. Alcohol related cirrhosis was more common in males than females (51.5% vs. 21.3%, p < 0.05) while NASH related cirrhosis was more common in females than males (25.2% vs. 5.6%, p < 0.05). Similar proportions of males and females had CHC associated cirrhosis (females 17.5%, males 19.4%, p > 0.05). Up to age 50 years alcohol was the most common cause of cirrhosis in both genders (31.3% of females and 42.4% of males). Over age 50 years alcohol remained the most common cause of cirrhosis in males aged over 50 years (56.2%), while NASH-cirrhosis was most common in females (32.9%). Patients with CHC plus excessive alcohol intake were mostly diagnosed under 50 years (68%). Less common causes of cirrhosis were autoimmune hepatitis, CHB, primary biliary cirrhosis, hereditary haemochromatosis, Wilson’s disease and idiopathic cirrhosis. Decompensation of cirrhosis was most common in males with alcohol or CHC-associated cirrhosis or older females with NASH-cirrhosis. Conclusions Booze, bulge and CHC (BBC) were the most common causes of cirrhosis in this clinic population. Nevertheless, females aged over 50 were overrepresented in the NASH-cirrhosis group.

Publication Type: Conference Item
URI: http://researchrepository.murdoch.edu.au/id/eprint/20003
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