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Health, stress and job satisfaction in prison officers

Dunne, M.P. and Morrison, D.L. (1991) Health, stress and job satisfaction in prison officers. Journal of Occupational Health and Safety - Australia and New Zealand, 7 (1). pp. 49-58.


Self-reported physical and psychological health, and perceived job demands, supports and constraints, were examined in a sample of 274 prison officers. This descriptive analysis focused on the effects that type of prison, officer rank, years of experience and education level may have upon physical and mental well-being and job satisfaction. Officers working in minimum security prisons report higher job satisfaction, less depression, boredom, anxiety, and fewer episodes of 'colds', insomnia, and non-specific stomach and back pain, than officers who work in maximum to medium security prisons. In addition, officers who were relatively new to the job and those with senior or specialist rank reported fewer general health problems. Prior educational background appears to be unrelated to these measures of health and satisfaction. The implications for further research are discussed.

Publication Type: Journal Article
Murdoch Affiliation: School of Social Sciences
Publisher: CCH Australia Limited
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