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Wildlife tourism, science and actor-network theory

Rodger, K., Newsome, D. and Moore, S.A. (2006) Wildlife tourism, science and actor-network theory. In: 12th International Symposium on Society and Resource Management (ISSRM) (2006), 3 - 8 June, Vancouver.

Abstract

Wildlife tourism, the viewing of wildlife in their natural environment, is a growing sector of tourism world wide. The presence of diverse and unusual wildlife is a major influence on visitors choosing Australia as a destination. However, in many circumstances there is little scientific knowledge available on the short and long term impacts on the wildlife on which such tourism depends. Given the diversity of possible impacts and possible responses, plus concerns surrounding sustainability, it is essential that good empirical scientific research is available to inform the management of wildlife tourism. This paper uses actor-network theory as a method to describe and analyse the sub-Antarctic/Antarctic region where wildlife tourism management is being guided by science. It explores the power relationships and potential transformations between scientists, wildlife and managers which allowed for the development of research into human-wildlife interactions. Using these theoretical perspectives this paper examines the key actors and intermediaries who were involved in the development and uptake of wildlife tourism science in the sub-Antarctic/Antarctic region.

Publication Type: Conference Paper
Murdoch Affiliation: School of Environmental Science
Conference Website: http://www.issrm2006.rem.sfu.ca/index.php
URI: http://researchrepository.murdoch.edu.au/id/eprint/1926
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