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Changes in the apical surface of chloride cells following acclimation of lampreys to seawater

Bartels, H., Moldenhauer, A. and Potter, I.C. (1996) Changes in the apical surface of chloride cells following acclimation of lampreys to seawater. The American journal of physiology, 270 (1 Pt 2). R125-R133.

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Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) was used to study the changes that occur in the morphological relationships between chloride and pavement cells in the gills during acclimation of young adult lampreys to seawater. Because chloride cells are located predominantly between lamellae and are thus obscured from view, the lamellae were removed with the use of a micromanipulator installed in a SEM. In gills of animals maintained in river water, chloride cells could then be seen to be dislike and typically to form single rows between successive lamellae. After acclimation to seawater, the apical surfaces of chloride cells lose their microvilli and change in shape from small circles to rectangles that extend the full width between successive lamellae. These changes result in an increase in the length of the paracellular pathway between chloride cells. Previous work has shown that the number of strands of the zonulae occludentes sealing this pathway declines under these conditions. This presumably leads to an increase in paracellular permeability of the gill epithelium, thereby providing the low-resistance paracellular shunt required for the passive movement of sodium into the environment during osmoregulation in seawater. The above changes are reversed by transfer of lampreys downward to 10% seawater.

Publication Type: Journal Article
Publisher: American Physiological Society
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